Midhurst developed organically, along a natural highway

Willow Creek was the indigenous peoples’ path for thousands of years before first contact.

Midhurst is not an “arrogant abstraction” but a near-perfect adaptation to the landscape. Those Penetanguishene Road pioneers would not have hung around if the Willow hadn’t been harnessed. A grist mill was essential for settlement.

Excerpt:

Civilization in Canada, as elsewhere, has advanced geometrically across the country, throwing down the long parallel lines of the railways, dividing up the farm lands into chessboards of square-mile sections and concession-line roads. There is little adaptation to nature: in both architecture and arrangement, Canadian cities and villages express rather an arrogant abstraction, the conquest of nature by an intelligence that does not love it…

The Bush Garden: Essays on the Canadian Imagination, Northrop Frye, 1971, p. 224.

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