Smacks of pretentiousness, pomposity, social hypocrisy, collective denial, or hollow ostentatiousness

Why does Linda Collins’ administration continue to deny reality?

The Midhurst Secondary Plan is deeply flawed and reckless.

The Emperor’s New Clothes” (Danish: Kejserens nye Klæder) is a short tale by Hans Christian Andersen about two weavers who promise an Emperor a new suit of clothes that is invisible to those unfit for their positions, stupid, or incompetent. When the Emperor parades before his subjects in his new clothes, a child cries out, “But he isn’t wearing anything at all!”

Speaking truth to power.

…”The Emperor’s New Clothes” is one of Andersen’s best known tales and one that has acquired an iconic status globally as it migrates across various cultures reshaping itself with each retelling in the manner of oral folktales. Scholars have noted that the phrase ‘Emperor’s new clothes’ has become a standard metaphor for anything that smacks of pretentiousness, pomposity, social hypocrisy, collective denial, or hollow ostentatiousness. Historically, the tale established Andersen’s reputation as a children’s author whose stories actually imparted lessons of value for his juvenile audience, and “romanticized” children by “investing them with the courage to challenge authority and to speak truth to power.” With each successive description of the swindlers’ wonderful cloth, it becomes more substantial, more palpable, and a thing of imaginative beauty for the reader even though it has no material existence. Its beauty however is obscured at the end of the tale with the obligatory moral message for children. Tatar is left wondering if the real value of the tale is the creation of the wonderful fabric in the reader’s imagination or the tale’s closing message of speaking truth no matter how humiliating to the recipient.

Wikipedia

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