In Anishinaabekwe culture, women have the responsibility to care for water.

February 25, 2015

Springwater Park is a major headwaters to the internationally-important Minesing Wetlands. In April 2013, they acted to save pure, uncompromised water (nibi in Annishinaabe).

josephine-smiling

From IndigenousRising.org, September 24, 2014: Meet Josephine Mandamin (Anishinaabekwe), The “Water Walker”

With a copper pail of water in one hand and a staff in the other, Josephine Mandamin, an Anishabaabewe grandmother took on a sacred walk, traversing over 10,900 miles around each of the Great Lakes. She is known as the “Water Walker.”

According to the Michigan Sea Grant, the Great Lakes shoreline is equal to almost 44% of the circumference of the earth. “When you see someone walking with a pail of water, you wonder, where is she going with that water.”

So the message is, water is very precious, and I will go to any lengths to and direction to carry the water to the people.”

“As women, we are carriers of the water. We carry life for the people. So when we carry that water, we are telling people that we will go any lengths for the water. We’ll probably even give our lives for the water if we have to. We may at some point have to die for the water, and we don’t want that,” said Mandamin.

Mandamin joined the team of indigenous representatives from the Indigenous Environmental Network at the People’s Climate March during the week of September 18th to the 24th. “Why I’m here is because I really feel for the water. And to give the message to people that Water is a human right.”

“Water has to live, it can hear, it can sense what we’re saying, it can really, really, speak to us. Some songs come to us through the water. We have to understand that water is very precious.”

In Anishinaabekwe culture, women are given the responsibility to take care of the water. “The water of Mother Earth, she carries life to us, and as women we carry life through our bodies. We as women are life-givers, protectors of the water, and that’s why we are very inclined to give mother earth the respect that she needs for the water,” said Mandamin.

That’s our responsibility, our role, and our duty, to pass on the knowledge and understanding of water, to all people, not just Anishinabe people, but people of all colors.”

In the wake of extreme extractive industries such fracking, oil, and coal, access to clean water is rapidly declining. “In our prophecies, in our Three Fires Midewiwin Society, we are taught that water is very precious. I was told by a grand chief that 30 years from now an ounce of water will cost as much as an ounce of gold if we continue with our negligence,” said Mandamin.

“If we discontinue our negligence, we can change things around. That’s why I am really embodying the prophecy. You’ve heard of ‘Walk The Talk,’ this is why I walk.”

Josephine and others are on the move this summer: Migration Water Walk 2015.

Waterwalkers

Posted on SpringwaterParkcc.org.


Springwater Township ponies up $10,000 to help re-imagine Springwater Park – Camp Nibi

February 21, 2014

An economically sustainable plan is what has always been needed.

Honour treaties park 20131226

It is appropriate that a 177 year old municipal township gets the ball rolling in welcoming back our 10,000 year old neighbours for what will become an internationally-important, cross-cultural treasure.

From today’s print edition of the Barrie Examiner by Cheryl Browne, Money possible to help Springwater Park pdf:

SPRINGWATER TWP. – The gates of Springwater Provincial Park may be pushed a little more open as council sets aside $10,000 for its re-opening this year.

Although the park remains technically locked up, Springwater Township council has voted yes to Coun. Sandy McConkey’s motion to set aside $10,000 to help re-open the provincial park that’s been in limbo since the Ministry of Natural Resources (MNR) changed its status to non-operational last year.

“I can’t say how the money will be used,” said McConkey, Thursday. “We just want to be able to have access to it in case the user groups need it.”

Coun. Jack Hanna, who also voted in favour of the motion, said the money would be set aside from the economic development fund, but won’t be approved until the township’s budget receives final approval Feb. 25.

“I know negotiations are ongoing with the MNR and First Nations who are considering making it a training centre,” he said, but added he doesn’t know the current status of the talks.

After 107 years in operation, the 193-hectare day-use park’s status was unclear last year after the MNR locked the gates. The 29 orphaned animals that were receiving care in the park were removed and sent to other wildlife sanctuaries across Canada.

Elizabeth Brass Elson and several other First Nations people quietly moved in to occupy the park in early April and remained there for the duration of the year, leaving just days before Christmas 2013.

Brass Elson named their campground Camp Nibi – the native word for fresh or spring water – and ran instructional classes on native culture, sweat lodges and full moon ceremonies, which continue monthly.

The also cleaned up after walk-in only visitors and called police when teenagers started fires and vandalized buildings.

Talks with the MNR and Beausoleil First Nation continued, and in December, Brass Elson said they were assured they would be given a voice in the planning and development of the park lands for the continued use of all.

“We were told we would be in a partnership with the MNR,” said Brass Elson. “It was a shaking-hands deal with Beausoleil council. I was told to stand down and go home and warm up, so I did.”

Although the gates have been chained shut since last April, Les Stewart of the Springwater Park Citizens’ Coalition said dozens of people took to the trails on Family Day.

“People are still enjoying it, so councillors setting aside some money for its re-opening is a positive step forward,” Stewart said.

Mayor Linda Collins, who voted against setting the money aside, confirmed if the budget passes, it would go towards the re-opening of the park this year.

“Nothing is determined yet. I’m not opposed to nurturing Springwater, but the County of Simcoe is taking the lead there, frankly because they have the bigger purse,” Collins said.

She says the county has been assisting the township by hosting meetings between the First Nations and the MNR.

“We’re not a big enough player so we need to join hands with the County of Simcoe,” she said.

Spokesperson for the MNR, Jolanta Kowalski, wrote in an e-mail ‘the ministry is pleased to be working with Beausoleil First Nation to discuss a future partnership for the operation of Springwater Provincial Park.’

Kowalski also wrote that ‘the ministry is not considering selling Springwater Provincial Park. Maintaining public ownership keeps the park regulated under the Provincial Park and Conservation Reserves Act and ensures this land is protected for future generations.

Brass Elson said she and several First Nations friends will go the park for an anniversary ceremonial sleep-over April 1.

“It will be nice to spend some time in the park again.”

cheryl.browne@sunmedia.ca
Twitter.com/cherylbrowne1

Come on out.

Sun park vertical 20140228 2

It’s about the land.

Sun Park 20131210It’s about the water.

Park spring

It’s about time for spring, I’d say.

Please distribute.

UPDATE:

The $10,000 budget was approved on Feb 25th. Thanks to those on Council who voted for it (4 “yeahs”, 2 “nays”). This amount represents about 0.04% of the township’s 2014 operating budget.

Proportionally, the County of Simcoe should be in the $161,200 range. Annually.


Happy Easter from Joseph Campbell

March 31, 2013

Joseph Campbell 1904 – 1987


The Mega Quarry is only 2/3 of the size of the farmland and health devastation envisioned by the Springwater Township land use plans

December 29, 2012

The Midhurst Secondary Plan added to the Springwater Park and provincial forest sales will be +50% bigger than the Mega Quarry.

Springwater Park and provincial forest lands

This consolidated plan will help to destroy the ability of Ontarians to eat and breathe.

A very good opinion article by Bill Nieuwland in the Barrie Examiner called, Valuable farmland disappearingWordpdf

The problem:

Unsustainable farming practices in Australia, the United States, western Canada, Latin America, Asia and Africa are causing widespread salinization, decertification, toxification and erosion.

The  solution:

However, in Ontario we have just witnessed a wonderful success in preserving 900 hectares of precious food land. Through a broadly based grassroots movement that raised the alarm far and wide, the Megaquarry was stopped in its tracks. It was the life- sustaining food and water source that would have been destroyed forever that prompted people to wake up and ask probing questions that the proponents of the quarry could not answer.

The Midhurst Secondary Plan, MSP:

 But what about our own equivalent of the Megaquarry? At 756 hectares, the loss of prime farmland to the Midhurst Secondary Plan approaches that of the Megaquarry.

True as far as the it goes but I would go farther than that: I think the MSP just the opening act for a much bigger, if possible, more grotesque mega-, mega-plan.

One Plan: (at least) Two Phases

Numbers of Hectares of food and forestry (oxygen producing) Taken out of Use

  • The Math: 756 (Midhurst Secondary Plan) PLUS +600 (Springwater Park and provincial forests) EQUALS +1,356 Hectares (that we know of so far)

Puts the  900 hectares for Mega Quarry into perspective, doesn’t it? (+50% more land)

Posted also on SpringwaterParkcc.org on December 29, 2012.


Power takes as ingratitude the writhing of its victims.

April 4, 2012

If no one answers your call, walk alone.

Let me not pray to be sheltered from dangers but to be fearless in facing them. Let me not beg for the stilling of my pain, but for the heart to conquer it. Let me not look for allies in life’s battlefield but to my own strength. Let me not crave in anxious fear to be saved but hope for the patience to win my freedom. Grant me that I may not be a coward, feeling your mercy in my success alone; But let me find the grasp of your hand in my failure.

Rabindranath Tagore 1861 – 1941


Any form of leadership may gradually turn into dictatorship.

April 3, 2012

Numbing the senses by monotonously repeating an assertion is a key element in utilizing mind control techniques.

Quotes:

Being a leader, carrying great power and responsibility for other people’s lives, is a monumental test for the human psyche. The weak leader is the man who cannot meet it, who simply abdicates his responsibility. The dictator is the man who replaces the existing standards of justice and morality by more and more private prestige, by more and more power, and eventually isolated himself more and more from the rest of humanity. His suspicion grows, his isolation grows, and the vicious cycle leading to a paranoid attitude begins to develop.

The dictator is not only a sick man, he is also a cruel opportunist. He sees no value in any other person and feels no gratitude for any help he may have received. He his suspicious an dishonest and believes that his personal ends justify any means he may use to achieve them. Peculiarly enough, every tyrant still searches for some self-justification. Without such a soothing device for his own conscience, he cannot live. His attitude toward other people is manipulative; to him, they are merely tools for the advancement of his own interests…

It is because the dictator is afraid, albeit unconsciously, of his own internal contradictions, that he is afraid of the same internal contradictions of his fellow men. He must purge and purge, terrorize and terrorize n order to still his own raging inner drives. He must kill every doubter, destroy every person who makes a mistake, imprison everyone who cannot be proved to be utterly single-minded…

Dr. Joost A. M. Meerloo, The Rape of the Mind: The Psychology of Thought, Control, Menticide, and Brainwashing, 1956, p 115-6.


There is method to the slaughtering of healthy, mature communities like Midhurst

February 16, 2012

Humans are social animals with a well-developed herd instinct. The science of animal handling pioneered by Dr. Temple Grandin can lead to some insights.

People value their communities because these relationships are central to their health: interpersonal, mental and physical.  One way to change these relationships is to administer a large shock. This disorients and makes the next stage much easier for the animal/electorate handlers.

Dr. Temple: Walks in, clamp head, boom. Over 100 cattle per hour. Block their vision. Calm or berserk animals. Vocalizing and stressed meat are related and to be avoided (except sheep). When quiet, easy to stun. Behavior to control, not force. Control the light, what they see.

These handling principles are in full display by the Linda Collins council.


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